Tag Archives: promises

Revising, revising, revising

Ominous, isn’t it?

Revisions are keeping me very busy these days, so the posting has been few and far between. My sincere apologies for my dastardly neglect. I could promise to be more faithful to this little blog, but why make promises that I know will fall apart when the fall semester starts anyway.

I sent off one lovingly revised article on evidence and the study of American religions, and now, all of my attention is on a survey of the scholarship of apocalypticism. Survey pieces, how incredibly time consuming and maybe just a bit fun. The fascination with doomsday still fascinates me, which is not really surprising at all, as does the constant psychologizing that accompanies news media accounts and some scholarship. So, while I revise, enjoy a musical number inspired by my current revisions:

Please note that the date on screen at the beginning of the video is December 21, 2012, the supposed (and debunked) time that the Mayans will end us all. Remember Ms. Spears’ wisdom: “Keep on dancing till the world ends.”

Religion and American Culture 2nd Biennial Conference Coverage

Religion in American History posted some coverage of the Religion and American Culture 2nd Biennial Conference (June 2-5, 2011), including some of my own thoughts. It is worth a look for those of you who missed the lovely conference.

Here are the posts in chronological order:

Elesha Coffman, guest blogger, “Do Religion Scholars Read the Bible?”

Janine Giodrano Drake, “Deconstructing the Tension in the Room”

Me, “The Best Part of ‘Believe’ is the ‘Lie'”

Paul Harvey, “Simple Things You See Are All Complicated”

Additionally, I promise I will back to blogging more regularly now that my summer respite is over, and I must get back to work. Look for more coverage of the conference, an addition of Gender and the American Religious Historian from the Berks, and my comments on posters for humanities folks.